Most Martial Arts & Self Defense Programs Are Totally Wrong for Women and Middle-Aged Men!

Regardless of whether or not you’ve trained in a formal self defense class or martial arts program, I’m sure that you have the same perception of the trained martial artist as young, male, fit, and very athletic. And yet, these guys are actually the least likely to be attacked in a self defense situation.

While they are the “most” likely to get into a fight, or to be attracted to the allure and fame of sport karate or mixed martial arts – they are not the typically victim of a street self defense attack.

This article discusses this, and several other reasons why most self defense and martial arts programs are wrong when it comes to arming women and older men with the skills necessary for effective self defense against a real attack from a real world attacker.

As pointed out in the self defense book called, “The Karate-Myth,” there are certain myths and misconceptions that our society has, as a whole, that get in the way of your learning effective, real-world self defense. One of these is the idea that just because someone has a black belt in this or that martial art, automatically means that he or she can defend themselves against an enraged attacker or street criminal.

Sorry. Just not so.

In fact, many martial arts systems are not focused on modern, real-world self defense.

The execution of some really cool skills… yes.

Self protection… no.

The reality is that, for women, the concept of self defense is a very difficult subject. Not because there is no defending themselves in a women’s self defense situation, but because even the best scenario includes the male attacker being about two and half times stronger than the female victim!

It’s true. If you were to stand a man and a woman, side-by-side, and all things were equal…

Same height, weight, size

Same fitness level

Same state of health, in fact…

All things considered…

She would still be outgunned by a ratio of 2 to 1!

And, when we think about the average man or woman of middle age, we get the idea that they probably…

Aren’t very fit, athletic, or quick

Haven’t exercised since high-school (if they were active then), or…

Are very conservative when it comes to dealing with aggression or wanting to fight

That means that, regardless of how committed they are to learning to defend themselves, the least likely they are to remain in a program that tries to turn them into the equivalent of a 20 year old male.

Probably explains why the typical, middle aged man or woman drops out of martial arts training within the first 100 days. In fact, studies where these folks were interviewed show that it was because there was not real world self defense training being offered that matched what these students knew they would be facing if they were really ever attacked.

The point here is that, if you’re serious about self defense, and you can relate to what …

"Most Martial Arts & Self Defense Programs Are Totally Wrong for Women and Middle-Aged Men!"

Do not Aim for the Ribs – Boxing How To Guide on the Right Hook Body Shot

Another in our series of boxing how to guides on body punching, this one examining the right hook (or back hand hook) to the body.

Knowing how to throw a right hook to the body enables you to deliver massive power to a very specific and precise location; the soft tissue below the ribs on the left side of the opponent's body. It is worth understanding that you are not aiming for the ribs. The rib cage is by design a tough structure. For maximum impact it's far better to take the path of least resistance and strike the soft tissue.

In general, and depending upon your position in relation to your opponent, this body punch is designed to hit the spot behind the guarding arm of the opponent. Precision is great, but raw power and aggression is the trick to knowing how to get the most from this crushing body punch.

Before we get onto the mechanics of how to throw the right hook to the body, you need to be aware that this is not a right uppercut. I'm sure plenty will decide that this is an uppercut, but really it is not. There is a subtle difference between a short range hook and a short range uppercut, with the uppercut to the body striking home in the center of mass. Understand this difference and it will have a positive impact on your body punching skills.

Boxing How to Guide – The Mechanics

  1. From the boxing stance, bend your knees in order to lower your centre of gravity. This is quite simply a duck, which aside from being a defensive action also acts as a precursor to a body strike.
  2. As the duck is taking place, generate an explosive thrust by pushing from the ball of your back foot. This thrust provides the energy to deliver massive rotation of the upper body (counter-clockwise from the orthodox stance).
  3. The bend of your front leg (from the duck) enables the necessary amount of hip rotation. Without the bend, your hips will complete maybe only 25{64aad3a316df32ff60dab9c8534014c5cfdef308ef860a6ce60ff66eaa8cfaf6} of the rotation necessary to give the punch the required power on impact.
  4. During the rotation, release your back hand in an arc at an angle of 45 degrees to the ground. Ensure that the punch accelerates towards the target to add to the massive leverage produced during the rotation; this is how you will maximize the power.
  5. Return your arm and body to the starting position as per the boxing stance.

Boxing How to Guide – Common Faults

  1. Be aware of your range. Be sure that if you use this punch at a longer range the opponent is vulnerable to it. In short, the further you are away from the opponent when using this shot, the greater the risk of you taking a punch before yours lands. Reduce the risk of a long range 'bombing' with this punch by stepping in with a jab ahead of letting loose with the hook to the body.
"Do not Aim for the Ribs – Boxing How To Guide on the Right Hook Body Shot"

Emma Watson

Early life

Emma Watson was born in Paris, the daughter of British lawyers Jacqueline Luesby and Chris Watson. Watson has one French grandmother, and lived in Paris until the age of five. Later, following her parents’ divorce, she moved with her mother and younger brother, Alex, to Oxfordshire. From the age of six, Watson wanted to become an actress, and for a number of years she trained at the Oxford branch of Stagecoach Theatre Arts, a part-time theatre school where she studied singing, dancing and acting. By the age of ten, she had performed in various Stagecoach productions and school plays, including Arthur: The Young Years and The Happy Prince, but she had never acted professionally before the Harry Potter series. “I had no idea of the scale of the film series,” she stated in a 2007 interview with Parade; “if I had I would have been completely overwhelmed.”

Career

Harry Potter

In 1999, casting began for Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (released as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in the United States), the film adaptation of British author J. K. Rowling’s bestselling novel. Of importance to the casting directors were the lead role of Harry Potter and the supporting roles of Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley, Harry’s best friends. Casting agents found Watson through her Oxford theatre teacher, and producers were impressed by her confidence. After eight auditions, producer David Heyman told Watson and fellow applicants Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint that they had been cast for the roles of Hermione, Harry and Ron, respectively. Rowling supported Watson from her first screen test.

The release of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in 2001 was Watson’s debut screen performance. The film broke records for opening-day sales and opening-weekend takings and was the highest-grossing film of 2001. Critics praised the performances of the three leads, often singling out Watson for particular acclaim; The Daily Telegraph called her performance “admirable”, and IGN said she “stole the show”. Watson was nominated for five awards for her performance in Philosopher’s Stone, winning the Young Artist Award for Leading Young Actress.

A year later, Watson again starred as Hermione in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the second installment of the series. Although the film received mixed reviews, reviewers were positive about the lead actors’ performances. The Los Angeles Times said Watson and her peers had matured between films, while The Times criticised director Chris Columbus for “under-employing” Watson’s hugely popular character. Watson received an Otto Award from the German magazine Bravo for her performance.

In 2004, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was released. Watson was appreciative of the more assertive role Hermione played, calling her character “charismatic” and “a fantastic role to play”. Although critics panned Radcliffe’s performance, labelling him “wooden”, they praised Watson; The New York Times lauded her performance, saying “Luckily Mr. Radcliffe’s blandness is offset by Ms. Watson’s spiky impatience. Harry may show off his expanding wizardly skills … but Hermione … earns the loudest …

"Emma Watson"

How to Get Fit by Boxing

Have you always thought that the professional boxers are the only one who go for boxing training programs? This is a completely wrong idea as there are many people who prefer boxing just to keep their body fit and active. An active body is the key to success from all aspects. In fact boxing is the only sport which not only makes your body strong but it also strengthens your mind.

Apart from the regular diet and exercise programs start practicing boxing for at least half an hour a day. Who knows gradually you will become the champion boxer of your locality as well as an efficient worker at the office. Many of you believe that boxing is just the right way to improve the muscles and make your legs and arms more active. But this is for your information that boxing will improve your self-defense, concentration and confidence.

Techniques of Boxing

A perfect boxing training is all about few right movements and a lot of hard work. The most popular moves are power punches, aerobic moves, sparring jabs and kicks actions. If you practice the moves under the supervision of a skilled trainer then the chances are very high that you will own a perfectly shaped body with extreme swiftness and reflex.

This is also a good way to burn the excess flab around your tummy. Did you know that if you practice full fledged boxing for one hour without taking short breaks then you will end up loosing almost 500 calories?

The heart rate is maintained at around 80{64aad3a316df32ff60dab9c8534014c5cfdef308ef860a6ce60ff66eaa8cfaf6}. The boxing programs are different for various levels. The beginners start with the nominal boxing schedules and gradually move to the next level when they are very much comfortable with the existing level.

How to Start Boxing?

Yesternight you and your family decided that you should start boxing and you will start it from the next morning – this is not possible as you need to do little preparation for this. First of all find out a place at home where you can start practicing the basic kicks and punches with a sandbag.

You can turn your backyard or a garage into a boxing ground. Buy some good quality gloves as they are the most important equipment for the boxers. Then you will need a tutor who can teach you the core techniques of boxing. Yes you can seek help from the boxing videos and books but the best way to learn is to get someone who can show you the punches and hits practically. If you do not have anybody at home who can help you this way then go ahead and join the nearest boxing club to stay fit forever.…

"How to Get Fit by Boxing"

The History Of Boxing Gloves

Boxing gloves have been around in one form or another almost since the beginning of boxing 3000 years ago. The ancient Greeks used to wrap their hands in leather strips in an attempt to protect their hands. But there was no padding in these early boxing gloves, just leather to protect the boxer's hands. Most people mistakenly assume that boxing gloves have always existed to protect the person being hit. But the bones in your hand are very small and fragile. The padding provided by boxing gloves is as much to protect the person swinging as to protect the person on the other end of the swing.

When the Romans picked up boxing as a sport from the Greeks they unfortunately turned it into a life or death type gladiator event. They continued to use Greek style leather strips as gloves. However, they hardened the leather and attached metal studs and spikes to the strips. As a result, in many ancient Roman boxing matches the loser ended up dead or permanently maimed.

This was too brutal for even the ancient Romans. They made boxing illegal in all Roman cities and provinces in 30 BC This distaste for boxing was so great in the Roman Empire that the ban continued in the entire Western civilization for over 1500 years.

When boxing finally reappeared in the late 1600s it was of the bare-knuckled variety. However, because of the more civilized approach taken to boxing it was not long before boxing gloves resurfaced as well. This time, padding was added. Jack Broughton, who was a British boxing champ in the early 1700s, is widely considered to be the inventor of the modern padded boxing gloves. However, these padded leather boxing gloves of the 1600s and 1700s were only used in practice and for informal boxing matches. The major public boxing matches were still bare-knuckle events.

But people were dying in these bare-knuckle matches, so something had to be done. Strangely, however, the boxing rules established in the 1700s and much of the 1800s did not require or even mention the use of boxing gloves. Boxers were very reluctant to give up the purity of bare knuckles fisticuffs. As a result, in many parts of the world boxing was banned in the 1800s and picked up its seedy reputation that continues today.

The beginning of the end for bare-knuckle boxing started in 1866 when John Graham Chambers in London published the now famous Queensbury Rules. Among other things, these rules required the use of padded boxing gloves for all boxing matches. By the beginning of the 20th century the Queensbury rules were used everywhere and bare-knuckles boxing was gone from established boxing events.

The last of the bare-knuckle boxing champions was John L. Sullivan. He lost his championship in 1892 to the first of the Marquise of Queensbury rules champions, "Gentleman Jim" Corbett. Not too surprisingly, the match was held under the Queensbury rules and both combatants wore padded boxing gloves.

Today boxing gloves …

"The History Of Boxing Gloves"

The True Definition of Conditioning in Sports and Fitness

Conditioning is a word that is used a lot in the fitness industry but what does it really mean to have conditioning? There are those that are ripped from strength conditioning, marathon runners have to go through a type of stamina conditioning and then there is the conditioning that is necessary for fighters and martial artists.

Conditioning can come off as this hard core concept of hard work and training to build your body up so it can perform or endure what the sport demands of it.

And it's true.

However, that is not the whole picture of what it means to be a conditioned athlete. Building your body and it's performance potentials is only the outcome associated to having "great conditioning".

The other half of the definition of conditioning is more about the discipline, the standard and the values ​​that you adopt.

"Great conditioning" is the result of adopting and integrating habits, standards and values ​​that slowly, over time changes and transforms the conditions of the body.

Conditioning is not so much about building yourself up but rather more about adopting a specific way of being that will serve you in the long run which is beneficial for the performance and execution of the skills in a given sport or physical activity.

So, how do you integrate a great conditioning ritual? One that will meet your athletic needs based on the sport or physical activity of your choice?

A good place to start is by looking at where your values ​​are placed in your sport. By looking at the components that you already have a natural inclination to favour and value, then you have a platform where you can design for yourself a discipline that you are more than likely to commit to.

If for example you naturally favour cardio, then use that as a base to develop a discipline to condition, not only great cardio but also as a way to condition better form, more strength and greater endurance doing the activity that is the source of cardio. It's also a great way to develop secondary attributes. If, for instance you typically rely on jogging for cardio but you would like to develop another physical skill or work on some upper body, than you might consider cardio boxing. Or you might want to develop better foot co-ordination and do some skip rope.
By focusing on what you already prefer, you are much more likely to build on it and develop a discipline and from a place of discipline is where conditioning can flow from the best.

Also, using discipline is a powerful way to predispose yourself to growth and improvement in a specific skill or attribute. Once you have established a discipline on a particular practice, then it's only a matter of pushing yourself and upping the ante in order to improve and refine that conditioning.

Let me leave with one final thought, and that is, when thinking in terms of the type of conditioning you feel you …

"The True Definition of Conditioning in Sports and Fitness"

A Golf Lesson by Paul Runyan – How to Master the Greenside Chip

Paul Runyan, old time golfer and 2 – time PGA Championship winner (1934 and 1938) became well known for his short game expertise. He earned himself the nickname of "Little Poison", chiefly because he did not drive the ball very far, but made up for this with an amazing short game. From time to time, Paul would pass on some golf lessons and various short game tips to his fellow professionals, which would then be taught to their students. One such golf lesson, which became affectionately known as "The Runyan", was how to play the greenside chip.

There will be plenty of times when you will find your ball just off the green, not too far away from the hole, but in some scrubby rough grass. You don; t really want to putt the ball from here, as you do not know how hard you will need to hit it to get it though the grass, plus the wiry grass can also knock the ball off line. Chipping the ball is another option, but this too has it's pitfalls, as the grass can grab and twist the clubface, knocking the ball off line when you swing through. This is where "The Runyan" golf lesson comes in.

Situations like this can be conquered through plenty of practice which brings the confidence with which to play any particular shot. This scenario would be the perfect time to put in to practice Paul Runyan's golf lesson. Here is how he taught it:

1. Take up your putting stance, and keep your front foot slightly open.
2. Make sure you are standing on your intended target line.
3. Now hold the club, as you would your putter, and address the ball. A good choice of club here is the 7 iron. The club should be on it's toe, with the heel off the ground.
4. Grip the club as you would grip your putter.
5. Place the ball in the centre of your stance, which has the effect of de-lofting the club.
6. Using your putting action, swing the club straight back and through. The clubhead should be kept low to the ground, and you should try to make this a "shoulders and arms" type of shot.

And that completes "The Runyan" golf lesson.

Played correctly, the ball will hop out of the grass and remain low, like a standard chip shot. The reason for this is that when you have hit the ball, contact is made with the toe of the club, which causes the swing to slightly deaden the hit. Due to the small amount of loft, the ball will slightly ride the face of the club. This in turn, causes some overspin, which helps the ball to roll forward. And the aim is to have the ball roll for at least 75{64aad3a316df32ff60dab9c8534014c5cfdef308ef860a6ce60ff66eaa8cfaf6} to 80{64aad3a316df32ff60dab9c8534014c5cfdef308ef860a6ce60ff66eaa8cfaf6} of the shot.

So, to conclude this golf lesson with a short summary. If you play "The Runyan" shot the way it's creator intended, the ball should …

"A Golf Lesson by Paul Runyan – How to Master the Greenside Chip"

MMA Training For Those With Hiatus Hernia Symptoms

For those suffering hiatus hernia symptoms Mixed Martial Arts training can assist as part of a plan for natural treatment. However martial arts and MMA fans who have found themselves with a hiatal hernia need to be careful when and how they train to avoid triggering symptoms.

Those with acid reflux problems like GERD, acid reflux disease and hiatus hernias MMA training and diet can sometimes be a challenge. Though at the same time sufferers from these conditions can greatly benefit from martial arts training even if they never plan on jumping into the UFC octagon. Obviously the training, exercise and a healthy diet can even help prevent many other health problems from developing.

Hiatal hernia symptoms just like GERD and acid reflux include regurgitation of stomach acid and stomach contents (food and liquid), heartburn and chest pain. A large part of the battle with hiatus hernia symptoms involves diet and exercise which are also two of the biggest factors in Mixed Martial Arts training.

If you have been training heavily or have been taking part in MMA competitions and have been experiencing symptoms, you may have a hiatal hernia and not know it. Diagnosis can be performed by a doctor using an s-ay. A hiatus hernia occurs when part of the stomach and the lower esophagus slides up through the hiatus (hole) in the diaphragm. Or when part of the stomach squeezes up through the hiatus next to the oesophagus. Those with a hiatal hernia need to be careful not to do themselves further injury. But building strength in core muscle can help prevent getting a hernia and help with symptoms. The potential link between GERD and hiatus hernias means those with a hiatal hernia should spend extra time focusing on the center body and abdominal.

Part of the root cause of hiatus hernia symptoms is digestion. Exercise and training promote better digestion and a good metabolism. This will prevent food from sitting in the stomach too long and creating the potential for heartburn. This does not have to mean grueling training for hours on end, but hitting a martial arts other workout class or the gym for 30-60 minutes 3-5 times a week can go a long way towards helping hiatus hernia symptoms as well as regular walks. If you suffer from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), acid reflux or other hiatus hernia symptoms you need to be careful when you work out. Avoid working out after meals as bending over or laying down can trigger hiatus hernia symptoms.

Diet can often appear like an issue for those who are serious about their MMA training and that have hiatus hernia symptoms. It may seem like the goals you want to achieve and what it takes to avoid irritating symptoms requires two opposite diets. Because it is highly acid foods like eggs and meat that are the worst culprits for causing high production of stomach acid, but are the same foods that are favoured by those desiring to pack on …

"MMA Training For Those With Hiatus Hernia Symptoms"

Boxing – Much More Than Physical Exercise

If you want to improve your health and physical fitness a boxing training program may be what you are looking for. As well as building body strength and fitness it can also go a long way to improve your personal confidence. Of course, by taking part in boxing workouts you will also improve your fighting form.

People who have tried boxing as a form of exercise find it to have very positive results, arms and legs usually gain a lot of strength and become more defined in shape. However, the benefits are not all physical. People also find that they gain a greater sense of inner strength and feel more emotionally balanced.

Boxing as a form of training and exercise became part of the large fitness training arena a few years ago. Great benefits can be found from boxing workouts on muscle toning and the cardiovascular system. It was the release of many videos featuring Tae bo and kick boxing workouts that made boxing rise in popularity.

The many innovative variations on boxing such as power punches, defence and punch and kick exercises have all the components of aerobic exercise. As you progress you will find your strength will build along with your confidence as you are taught how to execute punch and kick moves more effectively for a far more intense workout.

Kicks and punches which are performed in various combinations on blocks are done with an imaginary opponent, you have no doubt seen this many times on television etc. where the participant through punches and kicks into the air. There are also training facilities where there is the necessary equipment such as punch bags and so on. In some cases there may even be a real opponent to hit, they have very good padding on their hands of course!

Cardin kick boxing gives many more benefits other than the physical factors, it is an excellent way to burn off excess calories. In just one hour of kick boxing you can expect to use in the region of between 350 and 500 calories. It is also very good for maintaining a good heart rate of somewhere between 75{64aad3a316df32ff60dab9c8534014c5cfdef308ef860a6ce60ff66eaa8cfaf6} and 85{64aad3a316df32ff60dab9c8534014c5cfdef308ef860a6ce60ff66eaa8cfaf6}. This has been proven to be the ideal rate for anyone in training or exercising.

Boxing as exercise is beneficial for the whole body. As well as increasing arm and leg strength through the repeated sparring and jogging whilst punching at the same time,it also helps increase resistance and strength whilst greatly enhancing the reflexes and flexibility of all your muscles.

The workouts involved help to greatly enhance balance and co-ordination which in turn gives you body great form and increased stability and also allows joint movements to be more flexible giving fantastic results in physical fitness.

There are many benefits to be gained from all types of boxing training, that is on top of the physical benefits. In the training process you will learn a great deal about defence skills which, in today’s world could prove to be …

"Boxing – Much More Than Physical Exercise"

Building and Managing a High School Soccer Program

The following interview is with Coach Bill Bratton, who was my Soccer Coach at Cross Keys High School in Atlanta, Georgia for the school year 1989-1990. I asked him for an interview to share his thoughts on Soccer. He has been involved with Soccer for over 25 years so I wanted to pick his brain on the subject.

Stafford:

Hello Coach, you have been coaching high school soccer for over 25 years. How did you first get involved in the sport?

Coach Bill Bratton:

Hi Stafford and thank you. Well I started coaching soccer in 1982 in DeKalb County in my first year teaching at Sequoyah High. The previous coach had left and the school needed someone to coach. The principal offered me the opportunity to take over the program.

Stafford:

How was that experience for you and how did you prepare for this new role as a High School Soccer Coach?

Coach Bill Bratton:

I will admit I had never played or coached soccer before. In the off season I spent time preparing and learning by reading books and going to clinics. I will also admit that the players knew more about the skills, the formations and what it took to play the game than I did but it was the coaching organization of putting a team together to play as a team that was my strength. I really enjoyed coaching soccer once I mastered the knowledge I needed.

Stafford:

How long did you coach at Sequoyah and how did you end up at Cross Keys?

Coach Bill Bratton:

I coached Sequoyah for 4 years before DeKalb began a consolidation program and I transferred to Cross Keys in 1986. I had the privilege of coaching the Keys program for the next 20 years. I earned my Georgia class D coaching license as well as a Class C level National Coaching license from the USSF. The situation at Cross Keys was much like Sequoyah, they needed a new soccer coach and the AP who would become the principal offered me the position.

Stafford:

How was the situation at Cross Keys, and what did it take to build the program?

Coach Bill Bratton:

It took hard work and discipline to build the program. My job involved rebuilding a program. It had lost its organization, discipline was amuck, and the program wasn’t winning, just 2 years from finishing 3rd in the state. I had to incorporate discipline into the program and to teach players what playing on a school competitive team meant and was needed to win. This progress was going to take many years to complete.

Players would tell me “Coach we just want to play”. Cross Keys was a highly transient school. It was a constant rebuilding progress every year. They had no understanding of playing as a team, that they had to come to practice, to commit, and to be successful they had to play as a team. As I look back that took 2-3 years to get across. …

"Building and Managing a High School Soccer Program"